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EU Plans to Phase Out Internal Combustion Cars by 2035

ChargerChallenger

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Following a number of countries' plans to gradually ban internal combustion engined vehicles by certain years, the European Union itself has advanced legislation that would seek to phase out such vehicles by 2035, as part of a greater climate initiative. The European Commission is set to introduce proposals for binding emission targets within the member states, including a 55% cut in CO2 emissions by 2030, and 100% cut by 2035. That proposed 100% ban would effectively end sales of gas- and diesel-engined models, as well as hybrids.

The proposed framework is part of a greater EU climate effort aimed at achieving climate neutrality by 2050.


combination of measures is required to tackle rising emissions in road transport to complement emissions trading," the European Commission said in a statement outlining the goals of the European Green Deal. "Stronger CO2 emissions standards for cars and vans will accelerate the transition to zero-emission mobility by requiring average emissions of new cars to come down by 55% from 2030 and by 100% from 2035 compared to 2021 levels. As a result, all new cars registered as of 2035 will be zero-emission."

While the year 2035 might still seem some distance away, part of the proposed EU legislation would drastically boost the number of public charging stations among the member states far sooner, mandating a minimum distance of 60 kilometers between charging stations on major routes by 2025, and every 150 kilometers for hydrogen fuel stations.

Notably, the plan appears aimed at cars and vans, as stated above, so heavy trucks and buses would perhaps be exempt from these requirements to some degree, even though a number of automakers have already fielded electric buses in Europe.

The plan would also seek to use carbon pricing to reduce emissions, not only when it comes to cars, but cruise ships and office buildings.

"We chose carbon pricing as a clear guiding and market-based instrument with a social compensation," said European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen. "And the principle is simple: Emission of CO2 must have a price – a price on CO2 that incentivizes consumers, producers and innovators to choose the clean technologies, to go towards the clean and sustainable products. And we know that carbon pricing works. Our existing Emissions Trading System has already helped significantly to reduce emissions in industry and in power generation. So we will strengthen the existing system in these sectors. And we will make Emissions Trading System applicable to aviation and extend it to the maritime."

It certainly helps that a number of European automakers have already committed to introduce only electric and electrified vehicles in the coming years, but the proposed legislation is not expected to give hybrids and plug-in hybrids much of a reprieve, perhaps confirming the views of some industry observers that hybrids have been a compliance-aimed half-measure for quite some time.

It also helps that some individual cities in Europe have already adopted plans to ban certain vehicles from city centers, with these steps designed to promise zero-emissions vehicle usage in urban environments. However, these efforts have been piecemeal and have not extended to all major capitals of EU member states.

Several prominent lobby groups remain skeptical of the plan's viability
 

1971demon

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#2
Following a number of countries' plans to gradually ban internal combustion engined vehicles by certain years, the European Union itself has advanced legislation that would seek to phase out such vehicles by 2035, as part of a greater climate initiative. The European Commission is set to introduce proposals for binding emission targets within the member states, including a 55% cut in CO2 emissions by 2030, and 100% cut by 2035. That proposed 100% ban would effectively end sales of gas- and diesel-engined models, as well as hybrids.

The proposed framework is part of a greater EU climate effort aimed at achieving climate neutrality by 2050.


combination of measures is required to tackle rising emissions in road transport to complement emissions trading," the European Commission said in a statement outlining the goals of the European Green Deal. "Stronger CO2 emissions standards for cars and vans will accelerate the transition to zero-emission mobility by requiring average emissions of new cars to come down by 55% from 2030 and by 100% from 2035 compared to 2021 levels. As a result, all new cars registered as of 2035 will be zero-emission."

While the year 2035 might still seem some distance away, part of the proposed EU legislation would drastically boost the number of public charging stations among the member states far sooner, mandating a minimum distance of 60 kilometers between charging stations on major routes by 2025, and every 150 kilometers for hydrogen fuel stations.

Notably, the plan appears aimed at cars and vans, as stated above, so heavy trucks and buses would perhaps be exempt from these requirements to some degree, even though a number of automakers have already fielded electric buses in Europe.

The plan would also seek to use carbon pricing to reduce emissions, not only when it comes to cars, but cruise ships and office buildings.

"We chose carbon pricing as a clear guiding and market-based instrument with a social compensation," said European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen. "And the principle is simple: Emission of CO2 must have a price – a price on CO2 that incentivizes consumers, producers and innovators to choose the clean technologies, to go towards the clean and sustainable products. And we know that carbon pricing works. Our existing Emissions Trading System has already helped significantly to reduce emissions in industry and in power generation. So we will strengthen the existing system in these sectors. And we will make Emissions Trading System applicable to aviation and extend it to the maritime."

It certainly helps that a number of European automakers have already committed to introduce only electric and electrified vehicles in the coming years, but the proposed legislation is not expected to give hybrids and plug-in hybrids much of a reprieve, perhaps confirming the views of some industry observers that hybrids have been a compliance-aimed half-measure for quite some time.

It also helps that some individual cities in Europe have already adopted plans to ban certain vehicles from city centers, with these steps designed to promise zero-emissions vehicle usage in urban environments. However, these efforts have been piecemeal and have not extended to all major capitals of EU member states.

Several prominent lobby groups remain skeptical of the plan's viability
I'll be 83....I wont give a fuck...
 


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